Sarnia
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SARNIA, ONTARIO
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Hosting an event in Sarnia?

Sarnia is a city in Ontario, Canada, with a 2016 population of 71,594. It is the largest city on Lake Huron and in Lambton County. Sarnia is located on the eastern bank of the junction between the Upper and Lower Great Lakes where Lake Huron flows into the St. Clair River in the Southwestern Ontario region, which forms the Canada–United States border, directly across from Port Huron, Michigan.

There are more than 100 parks in Sarnia, the largest being Canatara Park, which covers more than 81 ha (200 acres) along the shore of Lake Huron. Canatara is an Ojibwe word that means Blue Water. The park was opened in 1933. Within the park is Lake Chipican, a haven for many different species of birds on their migration routes.  Most years, birdwatchers recognize around 150 species. The park also maintains a Children's Animal Farm as part of Sarnia's commitment to wildlife. The annual "Christmas on the Farm" weekend event held at the Farm in early December is a popular community event enjoyed by families. Canatara Park is one of the first parks in southern Ontario to feature an outdoor fitness equipment installation.

The largest recreational park in Sarnia is Germain Park, which incorporates five baseball diamonds, four soccer fields, an outdoor pool, and the Community Gardens. As a memorial to Canadian aviators who died in World War II, one of the remaining Canadair Sabres in Canada is on display in the park.

Centennial Park was opened on Dominion Day in 1967, as part of Canada's centenary celebrations.

Howard Watson Trail is a former railway line that passes through a combination of urban and rural areas. This linear park is managed by a volunteer committee and spans 16 km (9.9 mi) through wooded areas and alongside ponds. Benches are available along the path as well as washroom facilities. The path is open year-round: bicycling, running, and dog walking are popular activities in the summer. Snow shoeing and cross-country skiing can be enjoyed on snowy days. An access to Lake Huron is available at Blackwell Side Road.

Sarnia connects to the Great Lakes Waterfront Trail, which stretches over 2,100 km (1,300 mi) along the Canadian shores of Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair, Lake Huron and the Niagara, Detroit, and St. Lawrence rivers. The Great Lakes Waterfront Trail connects 114 communities and hundreds of parks and natural areas including wetlands, forests, and beaches.

Sarnia has one museum within its city limits, known as "Stones 'N Bones", which houses more than 6,000 exhibits. The collection includes rocks, artifacts, fossils, and bones from all over the world.

The former Discovery House Museum has been converted into a hospice. This historic house, built between 1869 and 1875, is recognized as a testament to Victorian Era construction.

The city's sandy fresh water beaches are a popular tourist attraction, while the sheltered harbour houses marinas for recreational sailing. Since 1925, the 400 km (250 mi) Mackinac race from Sarnia/Port Huron to Mackinac Island at the north end of the lake has been the highlight of the sailing season, drawing more than 3,000 sailors each year.

Sarnia's fresh-cut potato fries are another popular tourist attraction. Thousands of visitors annually visit the chip trucks parked under the Blue Water Bridge. Lynn Ogryzlo, a Niagara-based cookbook author and food e-magazine publisher, visited the chip trucks in August 2012 and said, "I was blown away by Sarnia." She was impressed by the city's waterfront, where the chip trucks are located, as well as by the products of the chip trucks themselves.  She published her article "Aromas of Local Food", in her e-magazine The Ontario Table, recognizing the outstanding quality of Sarnia's fresh-cut fries. Pat Brennan, a travel writer based in Guelph, also wrote about the quality of Sarnia's fries in his article, "Sarnia Boasts Best Fries in the World." (2007) In 2012, during construction along the waterfront, Sarnia officials created a special detour to enable visitors to reach the chip trucks.